Most Common Bodybuilding Misconceptions

Myths and half-truths surround us in every aspect of life, so why would bodybuilding be different? As soon as you set foot in a gym, you hear friendly advice that may or may not be accurate. How can you tell? Prepare in advance but not solely for the training. Busting bodybuilding misconceptions is your first challenge.

Expect hits from all sides

Bodybuilding, like every sport, is popularized by pro athletes who serve as role models to amateur bodybuilders. However, most beginners do not know that they don’t need to copy the pro’s routine to become a bodybuilder.

They are also easily swayed by convincing tips and tricks from supposedly reputable sources. At best, their techniques will make no difference; at worst, they will cause serious harm to a prospective bodybuilder.

The myths plaguing the world of bodybuilding are present in all its spheres, training, nutrition, bodybuilding supplementation, and lifestyle in general. That’s precisely the course of myth-busting action we’re taking here and now.

(S)train your brain

Don’t blindly believe everything you hear from everyone you encounter at the gym or listen to on the web. Fact-checking is a must if you want to remain healthy and unharmed. Bodybuilding is a strenuous activity that pushes you to your physical and mental limits. The last thing you need is to put yourself in danger of strains, tears, and health issues. The first thing? Knowing what’s good for you.

#1 High reps for cutting/Low reps for size

No matter how many times people repeat some bodybuilding misconceptions, they won’t become the truth. There are no workouts to get a muscle ‘ripped’ or make it ‘massive.’ If you wish to get more cut, focus on cardio and proper diet. As soon as you lower your body fat, you’ll see the results. Massive muscles result from progressive overload, healthy supplements, and – lifting heavyweights. The 6 to 12 rep range brings the best results for muscle growth.

A woman lifting and busting bodybuilding misconceptions.

Weight lifting sculpts a female figure; anabolic steroids aren’t.

#2 Women who weight-train look like men

Women trainees, relax. Weight lifting on its own will not turn you into bulky manly goliaths. Correctly done, it will tone your muscles, define them, and get you the shape and curves you desire. Women can only look like pro bodybuilders if they take anabolic steroids, eat, and train exactly like pro bodybuilders.

#3 Longer workout equals bigger muscles

There’s no truth in this equation. Practically living in a gym will not help you grow muscles quicker and bigger because some vital elements are missing. Only optimal diet, proper rest, and clever workout will provide needed results and turn a skinny guy into ‘oh, my.’ Overtraining will not.

#4 No sore, no grow

And not true. Soreness is not an indicator of muscle growth, but you know what is? Progression in training. If you’re gradually increasing the size of weights and reps each week with the help of quality prohormones, you will soon notice muscle growth.

Bodybuilding myths and nutrition

An optimal diet is a crucial part of bodybuilding training and is thus not immune to bodybuilding misconceptions. What you eat and when you eat it makes a significant impact on the effectiveness of your workout.

A plate with various foods.

A balanced diet is a key to a successful workout.

#1 Carbs and fats don’t mix

Yes, they do, and not just that, a balanced diet including fats, carbs, fibers, and proteins, is key to healthy nutrition during training. Well-rounded meals will keep insulin levels in check and help the body remain longer in an anabolic state, i.e., when natural muscle build-up happens.

#2 Muscles turn to fat if I pause training

A simple thing as molecular structure prevents muscles from turning into fat if you stop training. Muscles will shrink, true, but fat gain happens only if your calorie intake doesn’t decrease. So, if you need to pause your workout due to a life event such as home relocation, it’s ok. Don’t worry when the time comes to pack your sports equipment. Make it the last thing on your checklist, and you’ll have your gear ready and safe for the next training in your new home.

#3 Vegans and vegetarians can’t be bodybuilders

Vegetables and fruits will not make you fat and will help you build muscle. Their core ingredients, fiber, antioxidants, and nutrients like minerals and vitamins, will regulate your blood pressure and cholesterol level and assist post-workout recovery. If you wish to avoid fruit sugar as much as possible, choose oranges, kiwi fruit, berries, and ripe bananas. Plant protein doesn’t fall behind animal-based protein significantly, but even these deficiencies are easily substituted. A vegan would just need to get the right info on supplements and hit the gym.

#4 Fatty food makes you a fatty

Not every fat is bad fat. That being said, you need to increase your intake of healthy, unsaturated fats and eliminate bad, saturated fats from your diet. Moderate intake of ‘good’ fats is highly beneficial compared to abstaining from fatty food entirely.

Good habits complement training

Training and nutrition go hand in hand. However, nothing guarantees excellent training results like completing them with a healthy lifestyle. But even here, bodybuilding misconceptions prey on unassuming trainees.

A slim young trainee is lifting.

Progressive overload builds muscles, not overtraining.

#1 Rest is a waste of time

On the contrary, rest and a good night’s sleep are vital for muscle growth and regeneration. But your muscles are not the only body system straining during a workout. While it rests, especially during sleep, the body processes the stimuli it has received during training, repairs, and recovers. This important role should not be taken for granted. Nurture your body to reap the rewards.

Bust the myths, hit the gym

Nothing is more satisfying to an athlete than seeing hard work pay off. Busting bodybuilding misconceptions follows very closely behind. Sportspeople train adequately, eat properly and rest sufficiently to reach their ultimate goal. But equally important, they take the info they receive along the way with a grain of salt, even if it’s good-natured. Every person is unique and should develop a tailored approach to training, adjust the diet to their specific needs, and supplement it if necessary.